• PDC News
  • pdc news

Back

Strategies for Managing ADD/ADHD in the Classroom

July 6, 2020 written by PDC

It is all too easy to view behaviors in the wrong context when a child is blurting things out, not doing their lessons, or causing distractions in the class. That is why it is critical to learn how to quickly recognize and understand the internal issues with which these students are living with as early as possible, then find compassionate, evidence-based methods to help them overcome their obstacles to learning.

Students with ADD/ADHD: Strategies and Interventions for the Classroom

The diagnoses for Attention deficit disorder (ADD) and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have existed in one form or another since 1902. Even earlier, suggestive references to “mental restlessness” date back as far as 1798! But, it wasn’t until the late 1980’s that the DSM labeled the two diagnoses with the terms we are familiar with today. Modern studies on children and adolescents show that ADD and ADHD are more common than initially suspected, with the CDC citing stats as high as 388,000 cases nationwide between the ages of 2 to 5, four million from ages 6 to 11, and another 3 million up to age 17.

We have a dilemma on our hands. K-12 teachers bear an enormous responsibility to teach children who may be facing unseen learning challenges posed by these common disorders. It can seem like a daunting task to even begin tackling this growing problem in our educational system. However, that is where the Professional Development Courses at the University of LaVerne’s course  ADD/ADHD Strategies & Interventions for the Classroom comes to the rescue!

 

What are ADD and ADHD?

Let us spend a moment defining the problem. What exactly are ADD and ADHD? How do they affect classroom learning?

ADD is a mental disorder that can cause external behavioral issues. Typical examples include students who have difficulty complying with rules or following directions. While this may sound like the behavior of many youths, it is recognized as a disorder when children cannot control themselves. At that point, they face hurdles such as difficulty focusing on given tasks or keeping pace with classroom lectures. It can also impact their ability to turn in work on time and even negatively affect their socialization with peers.

Many people use the terms ADD and ADHD interchangeably as if there is no difference between the two disorders. ADHD, as its name implies, takes the symptoms of ADD and adds an extra element of hyperactivity and impulsive behavior. This twist leads to a range of symptoms like forgetfulness, lack of attention, disorganization, task avoidance, and a tendency to lose things. Additional complications can include excessive speaking, impatience, constant fidgeting, inability to stay still or silent, inappropriate behavior or speech, rude manners, carelessness, and daydreaming. 

In summary, ADD presents the same elements of inattentiveness as ADHD, without the hyperactive elements. Both disorders can create enormous amounts of distraction in the classroom.

 

Benefits of the Course ADD/ADHD Strategies & Interventions for the Classroom

As you can see, ADD and ADHD present behavioral characteristics that a teacher may find overwhelming and challenging. Unfortunately, though ADD and ADHD are learning disabilities, they often go unrecognized. They may appear on the surface as merely the traits of a child not wanting to pay attention or who is academically “lazy.”

It is all too easy to view behaviors in the wrong context when a child is blurting things out, not doing their lessons, or causing distractions in the class. Having a student with ADD or ADHD can quickly become a challenge for anyone...and everyone! That is why it is critical to learn how to quickly recognize and understand the internal issues with which these students are living with as early as possible, then find compassionate, evidence-based methods to help them overcome their obstacles to learning. Being aware of their diagnosis and supporting them with proven educational strategies can get them on the right track, paving the way for a successful future both in and out of the classroom.

Behavioral interventions in the classroom play a crucial role, which is why Professional Development Courses at the University of La Verne created ADD/ADHD Strategies & Interventions for the Classroom. Teachers, administrators, and staff all benefit from the easy-to-follow curriculum, which features case studies, stories, insightful interviews, practical management strategies, and helpful intervention tactics crafted to aid students of all ages who are battling ADD/ADHD.

 

Objectives for ADD/ADHD Strategies & Interventions for the Classroom

ADD/ADHD Strategies & Interventions for the Classroom, offered through the University of La Verne’s Professional Development Courses, is packed with real-world teaching practices that can equip students with the tools needed to enhance the performance of ADD/ADHD students effectively.

This curriculum is made specifically for busy K-12 teachers and features straightforward, self-paced online content. A few of the topics covered include:

  • Symptoms, characteristics, and treatment of ADD/ADHD
  • Misconceptions about ADD and ADHD
  • Empathizing with the challenges of living with ADHD
  • Best practices for teaching ADD/ADHD students
  • Engaging attention and eliciting participation
  • Keeping students on-task
  • Promoting productivity
  • Empowerment strategies for ADD/ADHD students
  • Creating effective action plans
  • Prevention and management of classroom behavioral issues
  • Recognizing diverse learning styles
  • Building strong parent-teacher coalitions

Successful completion of the course can lead to tangible, long-term benefits for any students who struggle with ADD or ADHD. It also may serve to aid your professional career as you leverage newly-acquired job skills to compete for promotions, qualify for salary increases, or obtain license renewals or recertification. Each district and state has its own policies regarding course approval. Before enrolling in a course, check with your school district or department of education.

This course also qualifies for the Inclusive Classroom Teaching and Motivation and Classroom Managementcertificates from Professional Development Courses at the University of La Verne.

(Note, certificates may not meet district or state requirements necessarily, so check with your district or department of education if you need to satisfy specific educational criteria.)

 

How to Register

Professional Development Courses at the University of La Verne offers ADD/ADHD Strategies & Interventions for the Classroomin both and online and PDF format, and like all of the courses, it is open for anyone to register at any time during a semester.

Registration is incredibly simple and can be done online or over the phone. Students may choose to enroll in up to a maximum of 15-semester credits at any time during each of the three semesters, and they can start whenever they are ready!  

  • Fall: September 1 - January 31
  • Spring: February 1 - May 31
  • Summer: June 1 - August 31

 

Students earn graduate, non-degree semester credit, reflected on an official university transcript. Are you ready to enhance your professional knowledge? Register today to get started!